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The Trinity Code 2.0 – Karma, Luck and Harm

Karma

There are two Karma Pools in The Trinity Code: Bad Karma (available to the GM), and Good Karma (available to the Players as a shared pool).

At the start of an Investigation, both Pools are empty. The results of some moves can cause Karma Points to added to either Pool.

Before dice are rolled for a move, Players or the GM can grab any number of Karma Points from their respective Pool.

If a GM grabs one or more Karma Points from the Bad Karma Pool, they impose a -1 modifier for each Karma Point they have grabbed. The Karma Points are kept aside.

Players may choose to grab one or more Karma Points from the Good Karma Pool, each of which adds a +1 modifier. Those Karma Points are also set aside.

Once any Karma Point modifiers have been applied, the Bad Karma Points grabbed by the GM are added to the Good Karma Pool. Similarly, any Good Karma Points grabbed by the Players are added to the GM’s Bad Karma Pool.

For example, mid-way through an Investigation, the Good Karma Pool has one Karma Point in it, and the Bad Karma Pool contains three Karma Points.

A Player attempt the influence move. Before the dice are rolled and any other modifiers are applied, the GM grabs all three Karma Points from the Bad Karma Pool. The Players, fearing a bad outcome, grab their one Karma Point from the Good Karma Pool.

The GM’s Bad Karma Point modifier imposes -3 to the move’s result. This is offset by the Players’ single Good Karma Point modifier of +1, giving a total Karma modifier of -2.

Once other modifiers are applied and the move’s results are calculated, the GM’s three spent Karma Points are added to the Players’ Good Karma Pool. Similarly, the Players’ expended Karma Point is added to the GM’S Bad Karma Pool.

After the move’s results have been applied, the Bad Karma Pool has one Karma Point in it. The Players’ Good Karma Pool now has three Karma Points – the ebb and flow of Karma has swung in their favour …

Note that the results of some moves have special uses for Karma Points, such as the Dabbler’s ability to cancel a single misfire effect of a spell if they spend a Karma Point from the Good Karma Pool. Any Karma Points spent in this way are immediately added to the Bad Karma Pool, ready for the GM to grab before the next move is attempted.

Luck

Each character has a number of Luck points, as determined by their playbook. 

Although some Professions’ improvements allow Luck points to be restored, in general Luck points are finite for the duration of a campaign.

Once a character has expended all their Luck points, they can never be regained. Each Profession will have a negative effect that is applied when a character is out of luck – refer to each playbook for more details on what that effect is and what it means for the character who is impacted by it.

Luck points can only be spent after the modified results of a move are known. 

A player may choose the effect of spending a Luck point from the following list. The first two options also result in a Karma Point being added to the Players’ Good Karma Pool as an added benefit.

  • The player can ignore all negative modifiers applied to the move
  • The player can roll the 2d6 for a move again, and must take the new result

The following two options result in a Karma Point being added to the GM’s Bad Karma Pool as an additional cost.

  • The result of a move is replaced by a 12+ (double results do not apply, although advanced move results are triggered)
  • The player suffers no harm

Harm

Each character has a harm limit of seven, representing the amount of damage a typical human can take before succumbing to death. Note that some Professions feature improvements which may increase the harm limit.

A character is most likely to suffer harm as a result of a combat move (although other dangerous situations may cause harm to be inflicted as a GM move – for example, a building that has the environment tag raging-fire-1 is likely to inflict a point of harm on anyone who enters it unprotected.)

In most situations, harm inflicted ranges from 1 to 3 points. Armour will reduce most types of physical harm by its rating – for example, a flak jacket with the tag armour-1 will absorb one point of harm, with the character only suffering the remainder of harm inflicted.

Note that armour also has a threshold value, represented by the threshold tag. Each time harm is inflicted and armour is used to absorb it, the armour’s threshold value reduces by 1. Once an armour’s threshold value reaches zero, it no longer provides protection, until such time as it is replaced or repaired.

Once a character has suffered 4 harm, they are wounded. Characters with the wounded tag have their abilities impaired, and suffer a -1 modifier to all +Power and +Quickness moves.

Once a character has suffered harm equal to their harm limit, they are out of action and unconscious. If they suffered harm which took them beyond their harm limit by one point, they are also dying. If they suffered harm which took them beyond their harm limit by two points or more they are dead.

A character who is unconscious is stable, though unable to make any moves. If they suffer no additional harm, they will regain consciousness within one hour, with a new harm inflicted total of six.

A character who is dying must make the cheat death move. Roll +Power.

On a result of 6 or less, the character loses dying and gains dead. They have lost the fight.

On a result of 7-9, the character retains the dying condition and must make the cheat death move once more (immediately, or on their next turn if in combat).

On a result of 10+, the character loses the dying tag and gains the unconscious tag.

On a double 6, the character loses the dying tag and regains consciousness, with six points of harm inflicted.

A character who has the dead tag is exactly that. Powerful magick indeed would be required to remove the dead tag from a character …

Stress

Each character has a stress limit of five, representing the amount of mental trauma a typical human can take before succumbing to the darkness. Note that some Professions feature improvements which may increase the stress limit.

A  character is most likely to endure a single point of stress as the result of a failure on a face danger move, although the GM may inflict stress on players at other points during the Investigation.

Once a character has suffered 2 stress, they are traumatised. Characters with the traumatised tag have their abilities impaired, and suffer a -1 modifier to all +Cool and +Wits moves.

Once a character has suffered stress equal to their stress limit, they are on-the-brink. 

A character who is on-the-brink must make the face your demons move. Roll +Cool or +Wits.

On a result of 6 or less, the character loses on-the-brink and gains lost. They are now under the GM’s control.

On a result of 7-9, the character retains the on-the-brink condition and must make the face your demons move once more.

On a result of 10+, the character loses the on-the-brink tag and their stress endured value is reset to four. 

On a double 6, the character loses the on-the-brink tag and their stress endured value is reset to three.

Note that some magick effects or rare items can restore sanity to a Player, resulting in them losing the insane tag, and also reducing stress endured.

Healing harm

Some items have a heal tag, together with conditions on their use.

For example, a medikit may have the heal-2 tag, along with the instant and consumable-2 tags. The heal value represents the points of harm removed from a player who is treated with the item.

In the example above, the effect is instant (the harm is removed immediately), and the medikit has two uses (represented by the consumable-2 tag, which would reduce to consumable-1 after one dose is administered).

Some magick schools allow the heal tag to be granted to spells which are created using cast magick, as detailed in that move’s detailed description.

During an Investigation, a character loses one point of inflicted harm every 24 hours.

Characters have all inflicted harm removed between Investigations.

Reducing stress

Some items have a calm tag, together with conditions on their use. For example, a sedative may have the calm-1 tag, along with the delayed and consumable-1 tags. The calm value represents the points of stress removed from a player who is treated with the item.

In the example above, the effect is delayed (the harm is removed once the character is in a position of safety), and the sedative has one dose (represented by the consumable-1 tag, which would result in the item being destroyed after it is used).

Some magick schools allow the calm tag to be granted to spells which are created using cast magick, as detailed in that move’s detailed description.

During an Investigation, a character loses 1 points of inflicted stress every hour.

Characters have all inflicted stress removed between Investigations.

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